Friday, April 28, 2017

This Joyful Eastertide - King's College Cambridge




192 This joyful Eastertide

1. This joyful Eastertide,
away with care and sorrow!
My Love, the Crucified,
hath sprung to life this morrow.

Refrain:
Had Christ, that once was slain,
ne'er burst his three-day prison,
our faith had been in vain;
but now is Christ arisen,
arisen, arisen, arisen.

2. Death's flood hath lost its chill,
since Jesus crossed the river:
Lord of all life, from ill
my passing soul deliver. (Refrain)

3. My flesh in hope shall rest,
and for a season slumber,
till trump from east to west
shall wake the dead in number. (Refrain)

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Holy Saturday




But this I call to mind,
and therefore I have hope:

The steadfast love of the LORD never ceases,
his mercies never come to an end;
they are new every morning;
great is your faithfulness.
"The Lord is my portion," says my soul,
"therefore I will hope in him."
   
 -  Lamentations 3:21-24


Nicodemus and Joseph of Arimathea took the body of Jesus and wrapped it with the spices in linen cloths, according to the burial custom of the Jews. Now there was a garden in the place where he was crucified, and in the garden there was a new tomb in which no one had ever been laid. And so, because it was the Jewish day of Preparation, and the tomb was nearby, they laid Jesus there.
    
 - John 19:40-42




http://www.lectionarypage.net/YearABC_RCL/HolyWk/HolySat_RCL.html

Friday, April 14, 2017

Good Friday



What is truth?

Nikolai GeChrist and Pilate ("What is truth?"), 1890.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pontius_Pilate#/media/File:What-is-truth02.jpg



A Joint Holy Week and Easter Message from the Archbishops of Armagh

The Most Revd Richard Clarke & The Most Revd Eamon Martin


“The truth will set you free.”  John 8:32
At the core of the trial of Jesus, Pontius Pilate asks a question, self–servingly and flippantly, “What is truth?” Pilate scoffs at Jesus’ idea of bearing witness to the truth. From Pilate’s position of power, truth is optional, inconsequential even; truth can be defined how one wants.
In many ways it seems as though the same attitude to truth prevails in the world of today. People talk of being “economical” with the truth, of “mis–speaking” instead of “lying”, and of “fake news” as the news that is inconvenient. The truth, the whole truth about the past can be covered up, manipulated, revised and presented to suit the agendas of the powerful today. But truth matters infinitely. Christians must not be content to keep silent in a world where truth has almost become a disposable commodity – occasionally of value, but capable of being twisted or discarded when awkward, disturbing or embarrassing.
Humanity searches for answers to the truth about our identity and purpose – who are we, where do we come from, how should I live, what is right, what is wrong, what happens when this life is over? For Christian disciples the answers to these questions are ultimately to be found in the dramatic events of the suffering, death and resurrection of Christ. It is Truth that is at the heart of the story of Holy Week and Easter. Jesus Christ goes to the Cross because he is the embodiment of Truth, betrayed by grubby ambition and squalid self–interest. The Resurrection is the ultimate vindication of the Truth that the God who is Love will in the end prevail over darkness, hatred and suffering.
The great German theologian and martyr, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, preaching in Berlin as Hitler was coming to power, reflected on Pontius Pilate’s question, “What is truth?” He said that although we may ask for the truth, there is also a Truth that is asking for us, seeking us out. We may live in a miasma of half–truths and untruths, but the Truth that is Christ himself is challenging us, on a daily basis, to take our place at his side in the name of unconditional truth and of absolute integrity.
In these weeks, we have an opportunity to delve deeper into the mystery of the Passion and Resurrection of Our Lord and allow ourselves to be taken over by the Truth who seeks us out. In opening ourselves up to Jesus who is “the Way, the Truth and the Life”, we can courageously face the truth of our own lives, and become people who live by, and bear witness to the Truth.
May God in Christ bless you all.
+Richard                                                              +Eamon
Church of Ireland Archbishop of Armagh           Roman Catholic Archbishop of Armagh

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Holy Week & Easter schedule at the convent

These services will be in our new chapel.


The Holy Saturday Liturgy will be at noon in the convent oratory next door. We also have several daily office services on a special schedule - call or email if you're interested in the times.

For Maundy Thursday this year, we will be going out to various parish liturgies in the area.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

My Song Is Love Unknown - music for Holy Week





1 My song is love unknown,
my Savior’s love to me,
love to the loveless shown
that they might lovely be.
O who am I, 
that for my sake
my Lord should take 
frail flesh, and die?

2 He came from his blest throne
salvation to bestow,
but men made strange, and none
the longed-for Christ would know. 
But O my friend, 
my friend indeed,
who at my need 
his life did spend.

3 Sometimes they strew his way,
and his strong praises sing,
resounding all the day
hosannas to their King.
Then “Crucify!” 
is all their breath,
and for his death 
they thirst and cry.

4 Why, what hath my Lord done?
What makes this rage and splite?
He made the lame to run,
he gave the blind their sight.
Sweet injuries! 
Ye they at these
themselves displease, 
and 'gainst him rise.

5 They rise, and needs will have
my dear Lord made away;
a murderer they save,
the Prince of Life they slay.
Yet steadfast he 
to suffering goes,
that he his foes 
from thence might free.

6 In life no house, no home
my Lord on earth might have;
in death no friendly tomb
but what a stranger gave.
What may I say? 
Heaven was his home;
but mine the tomb 
wherein he lay.

7 Here might I stay and sing,
no story so divine;
never was love, dear King!
never was grief like thine.
This is my friend, 
in whose sweet praise
I all my days 
could gladly spend.


Hymn #458  Hymnal 1982

via http://www.hymnary.org/text/my_song_is_love_unknown/fulltexts 

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Psalm 51 meditation: Allegri's Miserere



Psalm 51:1-18    Miserere mei, Deus

1 Have mercy on me, O God, according to your
                            loving-kindness; *
    in your great compassion blot out my offenses.

2 Wash me through and through from my wickedness *
    and cleanse me from my sin.

3 For I know my transgressions, *
    and my sin is ever before me.

4 Against you only have I sinned *
    and done what is evil in your sight.

5 And so you are justified when you speak *
    and upright in your judgment.

6 Indeed, I have been wicked from my birth, *
    a sinner from my mother's womb.

7 For behold, you look for truth deep within me, *
    and will make me understand wisdom secretly

8 Purge me from my sin, and I shall be pure; *
    wash me, and I shall be clean indeed.

9 Make me hear of joy and gladness, *
    that the body you have broken may rejoice.

10 Hide your face from my sins *
    and blot out all my iniquities.

11Create in me a clean heart, O God, *
    and renew a right spirit within me.


12 Cast me not away from your presence *
    and take not your holy Spirit from me.

13 Give me the joy of your saving help again *
    and sustain me with your bountiful Spirit.

14 I shall teach your ways to the wicked, *
    and sinners shall return to you.

15 Deliver me from death, O God, *
    and my tongue shall sing of your righteousness,
    O God of my salvation.

16 Open my lips, O Lord, *
    and my mouth shall proclaim your praise.

17 Had you desired it, I would have offered sacrifice, *
    but you take no delight in burnt-offerings.

18 The sacrifice of God is a troubled spirit; *
    a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise.

(Thankful to http://www.bcponline.org/ for making the psalm text available online.)


To read more on the Allegri Miserere or to read the Latin text of the psalm, you can go to the site where I first listened to this particular recording of the setting:
http://www.plough.com/en/topics/culture/holidays/meditations-for-lent/allegris-miserere-for-lent